Full Stack JavaScript Developer | Educator | Journalist

Code 401 (2 months left)- More bootcamp, more ideas

Added on by Madeline Stevens.

Tomorrow is Monday of mid-term project week. Isaiah came up with a great idea, one that is designed to help future 301 students with generating their final project ideas. The problem domain- as a 301 code fellows student brainstorming final API project ideas can be difficult if you don't know what APIs are out there and what projects are possible with the ones we are less familiar with. Our project is a database of popular APIs (an API of APIs!) that the user can search by keyword. Users will sign up and sign in to access our database and favorite the APIs they like after reviewing their capabilities. There will be multiple end points based on category and our vetting/ranking of the quality of the docs. Each API will have properties (i.e. project examples for each API, doc rating, token request time, limit on requests, etc.) that help the user decide if they should use that API for their project. 

Mid-term project brainstorming for 401. This project will be entirely backend. We are designing a server and a database using node.js and express. We will use mongoDB and mongoose to interact with the data in our mLab database. We will use TravisCI for continuous integration to our master code base and Heroku to deploy our project. Here is Gavin white boarding out what our database API schema will look like. 

Mid-term project brainstorming for 401. This project will be entirely backend. We are designing a server and a database using node.js and express. We will use mongoDB and mongoose to interact with the data in our mLab database. We will use TravisCI for continuous integration to our master code base and Heroku to deploy our project. Here is Gavin white boarding out what our database API schema will look like. 

My teammates and I also have a stretch goal for our mid-term project. We would like to incorporate a raspberry pi and one philips hue smart light bulb. The light bulb would light up red when there was an unsuccessful call to the database or light up green when the call was successful. We may not have time to work on this in the four days we have to complete this backend project. 

At some point I would really like to create the following personal project. I'm a huge Stranger Things fan. So I would like to recreate the alphabet wall used for communication in the show. 

strangerthingslights.jpg

I found a fellow on youtube who recreated the alphabet wall using not a raspberry pi but an arduino and his wall is WEARABLE. He uses a 25 input keypad (not sure how the 26th letter is handled...?) to type out words or cue up random flashing lights. The video is 37 seconds long, check it out below!

Below are just a few photos leading up to project week. 

Wednesday: There was a veteran tech summit being hosting at code fellows. There are over one hundred people behind me, socializing, and it was so hard to not get up and join my friends. I took my computer over to the presentation area to work and listen and support David who was hosting a panel but then had to get back to work. 

Wednesday: There was a veteran tech summit being hosting at code fellows. There are over one hundred people behind me, socializing, and it was so hard to not get up and join my friends. I took my computer over to the presentation area to work and listen and support David who was hosting a panel but then had to get back to work. 

Thursday: We didn't get to do the Avalara Bug Bash, we had too much work to complete. But Michelle took a break and grabbed some Avalara swag after everyone had left. Proud of you, Gavin, for winning "best bug found!" 

Thursday: We didn't get to do the Avalara Bug Bash, we had too much work to complete. But Michelle took a break and grabbed some Avalara swag after everyone had left. Proud of you, Gavin, for winning "best bug found!" 

This is a white boarding exercise on stacks and queues. In three person groups we were tasked with figuring out a way to compare an array of brackets, curly brackets and parenthesis, to make sure each had a mate. First we made sure there was an even amount. If there wasn't an even amount then the array would already fail the test. Then we pushed the first half into a stack, used if/else statements to compare what was in the stack to what was left over in the array still and popped them off if they had a mate. Once the stack was empty (stack.length===0) then we know we were done and the array passed. This is sort of like building your own linter! Which is so cool. Something we use all the time in Atom but sometimes take for granted. 

This is a white boarding exercise on stacks and queues. In three person groups we were tasked with figuring out a way to compare an array of brackets, curly brackets and parenthesis, to make sure each had a mate. First we made sure there was an even amount. If there wasn't an even amount then the array would already fail the test. Then we pushed the first half into a stack, used if/else statements to compare what was in the stack to what was left over in the array still and popped them off if they had a mate. Once the stack was empty (stack.length===0) then we know we were done and the array passed. This is sort of like building your own linter! Which is so cool. Something we use all the time in Atom but sometimes take for granted.